Anne Ursu’s The Lost Girl (2019)

The Lost GirlAnne Ursu’s The Lost Girl (2019) is a haunting middle-grade novel that dabbles in the fantastic, but it is real-world drama that drives the story-line. The novel is about two twin sisters, Iris and Lark, who mirror each other physically while having distinct personalities. The twins live with their mother and father, but (as is requisite for middle-grade fiction) the father is absent. He is in London on a six-month long business trip and is only introduced in the text through Skype. The story is really about the girls’ relationship with each other and their discovery of their uniqueness through a forced separation at school. The two had always been in the same class but start the new school year with separate teachers. This does allow them to experience individual challenges while learning that they can have separate experiences and still share a deep bond. Continue reading

Happy Book Birthday!

Image result for happy book birthdayThe Dragon Thief, Zetta’s Elliott’s stellar follow-up to Dragons in a Bag, is now available!

The Dragon Thief is a wonderful story that is both culturally specific and wonderfully expansive in its fantasy world-making.

Both books represent intergenerational relationships, chosen family, and annoying little sisters with wit and grace. These books will appeal to readers just moving out of their early-chapter book phase while also engaging older audiences. Of course, they also make wonderful read-aloud choices for home or school!

You won’t regret running to your nearest bookstore or library to check out this amazing new book!

 

Pat Cummings’ Trace

TraceA series of interrelated events assemble to create a haunting tale of intergenerational salvation in Pat Cummings’ debut middle-grade novel Trace. The title character loses his loving parents in a car crash that he miraculously survives and mistakenly blames himself for causing.

Trace moves to Brooklyn to live with his aunt, Lea, an artsy and kind woman who doesn’t have much experience with children but makes up for it with compassion. Continue reading