Follow Me on Goodreads and Twitter

Hi friends!

I am working to spread the word about RaiseThemRighteous! I am on Twitter at @jlmiller516 and on Goodreads at https://www.goodreads.com/RaiseThemRighteous! Please, follow me across platforms and share my blog with friends and family.

I’ve been posting socially engaged, diverse, and LGBTQ* #kidlit book reviews for about four months, and plan on adding middle grade and young adult literature to the blog in January!

I’m also a @CybilsAwards judge for easy readers and early chapter books – I love it! And, this year I’m going to be a Multicultural Children’s Book Day Reviewer for the first time. I love that these things exist and am so happy to participate!

Jennifer

Joanne Robertson’s The Water Walker

TheWaterWalker.jpgThe Water Walker (2017), written and illustrated by Joanne Robertson, a member of Atikameksheng Anishnawbek, brings attention to the work of Mother Earth Water Walkers. The group began walking around large bodies of water, beginning with Lake Superior in 2003, to bring attention to the water crisis. Robertson’s book, written with urgency, optimism, and humor, makes this important environmental issue accessible to young children. Even more, the story explores Indigenous traditions and values while depicting the important environmental activism of Indigenous women.

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Maya Gonzalez’s When a Bully is President: Truth and Creativity in Oppressive Times

Maya Gonzalez’s necessary children’s picture book, When a Bully is President: Truth and Creativity in Oppressive Times (2017), sends a positive message to children about the power of creativity, awareness, self-care, and community engagement. When a Bully is President requires reflection and discussion, preferably with a knowledgeable person who can help children work through complex connections between the “big” and “small,” past and present, forms of bullying Gonzalez describes.

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Daniel Vandever’s “Fall in Line, Holden!”

Written and illustrated by Daniel W. Vandever, “Fall in Line, Holden!” (2017), subtly references the American government’s forceful separation of indigenous children from their families, community, and culture. Sent to boarding schools, indigenous children were required to adopt Western names, hairstyles, language, and culture in a violent effort at assimilation. Vandever focuses the story on the rebellious spirit of a child who refuses to fall into line, highlighting the inability of powerful groups to stomp out resistance.

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Zetta Elliott’s Milo’s Museum

I love Zetta Elliott’s 2016 picture book Milo’s Museum. This book is clever, original, relatable, politically relevant, and sweet; in other words, everything I could want in a children’s book and a few things I need.

Purple Wong’s detailed and deeply meaningful illustrations complement Elliott’s story brilliantly. Wong adds multiple layers of significance by helping the reader see what the title character, Milo, experiences. Continue reading

Diana Cohn’s ¡Sí, Se Puede! / Yes, We Can!

¡Sí, Se Puede! / Yes, We Can! (2005), a bilingual text written by Diana Cohn and illustrated by Francisco Delgado, explores the Los Angeles Janitor Strike of 2010 from the perspective of a family participating in it. The text opens with the mother of a young boy, Carlitos, tucking him into bed before she leaves for work. The boy’s bedroom is tidy and bright, and Delgado’s bold and detailed illustration captures the young boy’s sleepiness and his mother’s love as they share a glance.

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