Phyllis Rothblatt’s All I Want To Be Is Me (2011)

All I Want To Be Is Me

All I Want To Be Is Me (2011), written and illustrated by Phyllis Rothblatt, MFT, is a sweet book that affirms the value of gender diversity. Rothblatt uses brief vignettes with text taken from song lyrics as well as emotionally evocative images to communicate her celebratory message. Some of the racially diverse gender creative children depicted identify as transgender while others take a more ambivalent approach to gender identification. Continue reading

Trans* and Gender Creative Kid Lit

Here’s a list of books I’ve reviewed about kids who reject gender norms. Check out the reviews and commit to adding one to your personal or school library!!

I’m reviewing LGBTQ# inclusive children’s picture books at RaiseThemRighteous.

If you are an author/publisher (traditional/indie/self-published) contact me for a review and to learn more about my book project!

Jamie Is Jamie: A Book About Being Yourself and Playing Your Way

My Princess BoyFrom the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the SeaJack (Not Jackie)

This review is part of my “Snapshots of LGBTQ Kid Lit” project. I’m working on a book, The New Queer Children’s Literature: Exploring the Principles and Politics of LGBTQ* Children’s Picture Books, which is under contract with the University Press of Mississippi. Part of my research is identifying and interpreting English-language children’s picture books with LGBTQ* content published in the US and Canada between 1979 and 2019. Follow my blog to follow my journey!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez’s They She He Me: Free to Be (2017)

They She He Me: Free to Be (2017), by Maya and Matthew Smith-Gonzalez, is a celebration of diversity in its many forms. People with different boy-types, skin-tones, and gender expressions are thoughtfully illustrated above a variety of pronouns that are repeated across the two-page spread. The text suggests that gender is not written on the body but is instead a personal identity that can change over time. It seeks to uncouple gender from the body while simultaneously troubling a gender binary. The creators provide lots of useful backmatter that explains gender, pronouns, and the importance of inclusivity. I think this is a lovely teaching aid that will encourage discussions about the social and personal dimensions of gender for all ages. Continue reading