children

Lesléa Newman’s Saturday is Patty Day (1993)

Saturday is Patty Day (1993), written by Lesléa Newman and illustrated by Annette Hegel, is one of the earliest children’s picture books to deal with lesbian parenting and divorce. Newman does a wonderful job creating a teachable text that accounts for the challenges of seperation. I particularly appreciate her sensitive […]

Keri T. Collins’ You Can Call Me Katelyn (2019)

Today (5/1/19) is the official release date of You Can Call Me Katelyn, a fun #girlpower children’s picture book, written by Keri T. Collins and playfully illustrated by Marcia Adams Ho. The friendly and accessible first-person-narrative introduces young readers to Katelyn, a cheerful and confident girl determined to change her […]

Trans* and Gender Creative Kid Lit

Here’s a list of books I’ve reviewed about kids who reject gender norms. Check out the reviews and commit to adding one to your personal or school library!! I’m reviewing LGBTQ# inclusive children’s picture books at RaiseThemRighteous. If you are an author/publisher (traditional/indie/self-published) contact me for a review and to […]

Maya Gonzalez’s When a Bully is President: Truth and Creativity in Oppressive Times

Maya Gonzalez’s necessary children’s picture book, When a Bully is President: Truth and Creativity in Oppressive Times (2017), sends a positive message to children about the power of creativity, awareness, self-care, and community engagement. When a Bully is President requires reflection and discussion, preferably with a knowledgeable person who can […]

Helga Bansch’s Odd Bird Out

Written and illustrated by Helga Bansch, Odd Bird Out is the story of a flamboyant raven named Robert. Bansch introduces a fabulously queer character who finds himself by leaving his repressive nest. Although not widely available, Bansch’s raucous picture book is worth the hunt!

Stacy B. Davids’ Annie’s Plaid Shirt

Annie’s Plaid Shirt (2015) is the cleverly crafted tale of a plaid shirt loving girl whose mother doesn’t quite understand how important her shirt is to her identity. Written by Stacy B. Davids, a clinical psychologist, and warmly illustrated by Rachel Balsaitis, this text earns four thumbs up from me […]

Daniel Vandever’s “Fall in Line, Holden!”

Written and illustrated by Daniel W. Vandever, “Fall in Line, Holden!” (2017), subtly references the American government’s forceful separation of indigenous children from their families, community, and culture. Sent to boarding schools, indigenous children were required to adopt Western names, hairstyles, language, and culture in a violent effort at assimilation. […]