Jason Martinez’s My Mommy is a Boy (2013)

My Mommy Is a Boy by [Martinez, Jason, Winchester, Karen]Written by Jason Martinez and illustrated by Karen Winchester the self-published My Mommy is a Boy (2013) is a short picture book told from the point-of-view of a little girl named Amaya whose parent is transitioning. The amateurish illustrations and use of the “she” pronoun throughout detract from the story and confused the four-year-old I shared it with. He didn’t understand why Amaya kept referring to her parent as “mommy” and using she/her/hers pronouns, since he was a man.

It is a bit jarring.

Although the author notes on the back cover that he wrote the book for his daughter to “show her that I care about how she feels and to show her how much I love her” the confusion his daughter may have experienced, confusion he tried to convey, doesn’t translate well to helping other children understand the gender transition of a parent. Continue reading

AMPLIFY: Alex Logan @ Almost, Almost

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My name is Jennifer Miller and I blog about children’s books at Raise Them Righteous. I recently started a new project on my blog – AMPLIFY – to boost blogs and bloggers that I love and am excited to support. Today I’m featuring Alex Logan’s blog Almost, Almost.

Alex reviews queer literature and their blog is AMAZING. Please, take a look and support Alex’s important work by following their blog! Check it out here: Almost, Almost. You can follow Alex on Twitter, too! Check them out: @AAlexLogan

Please, take a minute to read about Alex and their blog! I’ll continue to AMPLIFY Alex and their blog throughout the week by sharing some of their favorite blog posts at Raise Them Righteous!

Bio: I’m Alex Logan (they/them). I’m an asexual and agender reader, writer, and librarian from New York State. I love books and languages and my other main interest is soccer, which I both watch and play (and, of course, read about!)

When did you start blogging?

I started blogging on Almost, Almost in August 2016, and started blogging primarily about bookish topics starting in June 2017.

Why did you start blogging?

I originally started blogging when I was coming to terms with and becoming more public about my nonbinary gender identity; I wanted a place where I could reflect and work things out with a supportive community at a time when I was still firmly closeted in real life, or just starting to come out to close friends. Then, in June 2017, I decided to combine my interests in LGBTQ issues with my passion for books and do a month of Reading for Pride posts, where I read exclusively LGBTQ books and shared what I was reading on the blog.

What specific content do you blog about? Why?

I currently blog mostly about LGBTQ books. I enjoyed the posts I did for my Reading for Pride month so much that I started doing a weekly Rainbow Reading roundup of the LGBTQ books I was reading. As a librarian, I’m always happy to do reader’s advisory and generally talk about books, and as a librarian I also have access to a lot of books, including under-the-radar books that I love to share with more people. At the time, I also was in the process of writing a book of my own – Royal Rescue, a young adult fantasy novel with an aro-ace protagonist that was published by NineStar Press in April 2019 – so I had books on the brain even more than usual. As a result, the blog shifted from mostly personal posts to mostly bookish ones – although I still do some posts about asexuality, medically transitioning as a nonbinary person, being out at work, and more.

Lois Gould’s X: A Fabulous Child’s Story

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Written by Lois Gould and first published by Ms.  in 1972, X: A Fabulous Child’s Story, was republished in 1978 by Daughters Publishing Company with illustrations by Jacqueline Chwast. The short story that became a picture book challenges the idea that gender is a natural expression clearly connected to the sexed body. Instead, it suggests that gender is a learned behavior that restricts freedom. Continue reading

Book Mail

 

I love book mail. Keri T. Collins You Can Call Me Katelyn is an amazing book about empowering children to shape their identities and lives! Full review coming soon!

Look for this title MAY 2019!

Brian McNaught’s “What’s ‘gay’?” asked Mae (2018)

The very odd “What’s ‘gay’?” asked Mae (2018) written by Brian McNaught and illustrated by Dave Woodford, tracks a conversation two children have with a variety of birds about the meaning of the word ‘gay.’ Beyond the awkward set-up—Mae asks her cousin Ray what ‘gay’ means and birds respond—the text is poorly formatted, and the illustrations do not reflect a consistent style. The short book is jarring and uncomfortable to read aloud. Although the message of acceptance is commendable, this short picture book isn’t a good vehicle. Continue reading

Syrus Marcus Ware’s Love is in the Hair (2015)

Love Is In The Hair

Love is in the Hair, published in 2015 by Flamingo Rampant, is written and illustrated by Syrus Marcus Ware. The sweet story, perfect for bedtime, focuses on a little girl, Carter, with light brown skin and a big smile. Carter is about to become a  sister, and is unable to sleep the night before her sibling’s arrival. Her mom and dad are at the hospital and her two uncles are caring for her. Continue reading

Robb Pearlman’s Pink is for Boys (2018)

Pink is for Boys (2018), written by Robb Pearlman and illustrated by Eda Kaban works to disrupt the idea that pink is for girls and blue is for boys. It does this through simple prose and bright, fun illustrations. Several colors, including pink, green, blue, and purple, are explored over a pair of two-page spreads. The first spread assures readers that x color is for girls and boys. The second spread reinforces the message. Continue reading