Jane Severance’s When Megan Went Away (1979)

 

Written by Jane Severance and illustrated by Tea Schook, When Megan Went Away (1979), is the first book about lesbian moms published in the US. It was published by Lollipop Power, Inc., a small feminist press deeply invested in producing children’s picture books that challenged gender stereotypes as well as the absence of lesbian and gay representation in children’s culture. Continue reading

Book Mail/Book Love

Book mail is one of my favorite things about blogging! I have stumbled upon some amazing publishers and authors creating important work that I am proud to add to my bookshelf and help promote!

If you are an author or publisher working on diverse, LGBTQ* inclusive, socially relevant books for children and young adults, please contact me!

I am happy to review and promote your work on my blog (1600+ followers), Twitter (1500+) followers, as well as on GoodReads and Amazon!

 

 

 

 

Christine Emery’s The Black Cloud Blues

The Black Cloud BluesWritten by Christine A. Emery and illustrated by Kellie R. Emery, The Black Cloud Blues does the important work of acknowledging childhood depression. In doing so it makes a valuable contribution to children’s literature. Kellie Emery’s deliberate illustrations provide access to the unnamed narrator’s feelings as he takes readers on a journey into his experience with depression. Continue reading

Elise Gravel’s You Can Be

You Can BeElise Gravel’s board book, You Can Be, subtly rejects gender stereotypes while introducing very young readers to a range of characteristics through images of diverse children embodying them.

Steely-blue and bright-red images leap off the glossy-white background of each page. The cover features the back of a young child with light-brown skin and long black hair running in a garden. It sets the tone for the text, welcoming young readers into the book to explore all the things they can be. Continue reading