Monica Clark-Robinson’s Let the Children March

Let the Children March, written by Monica Clark-Robinson and illustrated by Frank Morrison, is a brilliant and bold children’s picture book that brings the Birmingham Children’s Crusade of 1963 to life for young readers. In the South, Jim Crow laws enforced segregation, which led to unequal access to education, employment, […]

Deborah Hopkinson’s Carter Reads the Newspaper

Deborah Hopkinson makes history accessible to young readers through remarkably engaging and accessible children’s picture books. Her recent publication, Carter Reads the Newspaper, is no exception. Although I was planning on sticking to #ownvoices books throughout Black History Month, Hopkinson’s book is a wonderful description of Carter G. Woodson’s life […]

Tomie dePaola’s Bonjour, Mr. Satie (1991)

Bonjour, Mr. Satie (1991) by Tomie dePaola is the story of two children, Rosalie and Conrad, their uncle, Mr. Satie, and his “companion,” Ffortusque Ffollet, Esq. When the two world travelers visit their family, they bring Paris to America through French cuisine, a smattering of French words, and enchanting stories […]

Jennifer Carr’s Be Who You Are (2010)

Be Who You Are (2010), written by Jennifer Carr and illustrated by Ben Rumback, explores a young transgender girl’s transition. Although Hope’s sex assignment was male, she always felt like a girl. She tells her very accepting parents while she is quite young, and they support her. However, Hope isn’t […]

Samantha Thornhill’s A Card for my Father

A Card for my Father, written by Samantha Thornhill and illustrated by Morgan Clement, is brilliantly and beautifully told from the point-of-view of Flora Gardner, a little girl who has never met her father. Flora has light brown skin and big expressive eyes underlined by a dash of freckles. Readers […]