Bai Phi’s A Different Pond

A Different PondIn A Different Pond, author, Bao Phi, and illustrator, Thi Bui, both Vietnamese Americans, create a necessary and impactful story that is both a tribute to their working-class new immigrant childhoods and a valuable #OwnVoices contribution to children’s literature. The story is anchored in a purposeful fishing trip a father and son take to secure food for the family. Rich colors and a creative use of panels provide intimate portraits of the duo. Continue reading

Paul Czajak’s The Book Tree

The Book TreeWritten by Paul Czajak and illustrated by Rashin Kheiriyeh, The Book Tree reads like a love letter to books in all their sensual glory. Czajak lingers on descriptions of the scent and sound of books as his story of a tyrant’s failed attempt to destroy all books, and a boy’s desire to awe and be awed by stories, unfolds. Kheiriyeh’s textured illustrations complement Czajak’s story and enchant with a bold and deliberate color palatte of red and teal with hints of yellow. Each illustration contains elements at once familiar and unfamiliar: teakettles precariously balanced on heads, oversized dandelion puffs blowing boys away, and regal ladies unsure how to use umbrellas. A story about pleasure, passion, and wayward pages, The Book Tree manages to be both timely and timeless. Continue reading

Anna Humphrey’s Megabat

In Anna Humphrey’s Megabat, a boy named Daniel leaves his friends, school, and home behind when his family moves to a new city. He is unenthusiastic about his creaky, kind of creepy, new house and resolutely refuses to try to make friends; that is, until he is jolted out of his loneliness by a talking bat who has taken up residence in his new attic bedroom. The two quickly bond over shared sadness and Star Wars. It turns out the bat, who is from Borneo, wandered into a shipping container and accidentally ended up half way around the world. Once Daniel meets the talking bat, who he names Megabat, the central conflict of the story shifts from getting Daniel comfortable in his new home to getting Megabat home. Continue reading

Nominate Your Favorite #kidlit and #ya

Do it! I started blogging to help spread the word about diverse, socially engaged, children’s literature. Be a microphone for all the beautiful diverse voices in children’s literature. Nominate your favorite #kidlit and #ya books for a Cybils Award. Change a bookshelf for the better!!! Here’s the link: http://www.cybils.com/2018/10/the-2018-nominations-are-now-open.html

Cybils-Logo-2018-Nominated

Only 5 Days Left to Nominate Your Favorite #kidlit and #YA Books for a Cybils Awards!

https://i2.wp.com/www.cybils.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Cybils-Logo-2018-Slogan.jpgThe 2018 Nomination categories include:

Follow this link to nominate your favorite books in all our categories. You have until October 15th.

I’m a judge for Easy Readers and Early Chapter Books. Put me to work!

(Please, retweet a lot)!

 

Linda Urban’s Road Trip with Max and His Mom

Linda Urban’s Road Trip with Max and His Mom (2018) is a clever follow up to Weekends with Max and His Dad (2016). In both books a young Max adjusts to his parent’s recent divorce. Urban’s second installment pivots around a road trip to Pennsylvania that nine-year-old Max and his Mom take to celebrate his Great Great Aunt Victory’s 100th birthday. Continue reading

J.E. Morris’s new series Maud the Koala

Fish Are Not Afraid of Doctors by J. E. MorrisJ.E. Morris’s new series Maud the Koala introduces early readers to a wonderfully relatable character and helps build visual literacy as well as reading confidence. The series is thoughtfully illustrated in the tradition of comics with action moving across panels and tiers. Full-page spreads allow the reader to become immersed in imagery. Fish are Not Afraid of Doctors is a delightful book about a young koala’s apprehension about visiting the doctor. Continue reading

Debbi Michiko Florence’s Jasmine Toguchi Series

Debbie Michiko Florence’s delightful early chapter book series, about an 8-year-old Japanese American girl named Jasmine Toguchi, provides readers with accessible and engaging snapshots of Japanese cultural traditions as well as universal struggles of growing up in the US. Continue reading